2 Titles

New Historical Perspectives

New Historical Perspectives is a book series for early career historians (within 10 years of their doctorate), commissioned and edited by the Royal Historical Society, and published as an imprint of the Institute of Historical Research by the University of London Press. It seeks to publish innovative and high-quality research in accessible online formats.

All titles are published in print (hard- and paperback) and as Open Access (OA) from first publication. Open Access editions appear on the OA platform of the University of London Press, and as part of JSTOR's Open Access Books, enabling full book and chapter downloads. Titles are published Open Access with no fees charged to the author or the author's institution.

Monograph authors also receive a workshop with invited specialists to discuss their work before its final submission, and guidance from members of the NHP's academic editorial board who also oversee a careful peer-review process.

The first titles in the series will appear in late 2019 and Spring 2020, with further books published regularly from this point.

Cover for Cinemas and Cinema-Going in the United Kingdom: Decades of Decline, 1945–65 Cinemas and Cinema-Going in the United Kingdom: Decades of Decline, 1945–65
Sam Manning
March 31, 2020

Cinema-going was the most popular commercial leisure activity in the first half of the twentieth century, peaking in 1946 with 1.6 billion recorded admissions. Though ‘going to the pictures’ remained a popular pastime, the transition to peacetime altered citizens’ leisure habits. During the 1950s increased affluence, the growth of television ownership and the diversification of leisure led to rapid declines in attendance. Cinema attendances fell in all regions, but the speed, nature and extent of decline varied widely across the United Kingdom.

By linking national...

Cover for The Family Firm: Monarchy, Mass Media and the British Public, 1932-53 The Family Firm: Monarchy, Mass Media and the British Public, 1932-53
Edward Owens
October 15, 2019

The Family Firm presents the first major historical analysis of the transformation of the royal household’s public relations strategy in the period 1932-1953. Beginning with King George V’s first Christmas broadcast, Buckingham Palace worked with the Church of England and the media to initiate a new phase in the House of Windsor’s approach to publicity.

This book also focuses on audience reception by exploring how British readers, listeners, and viewers made sense of royalty’s new...