34 Titles

Institute of Historical Research

Cover for The Control of the Past: Herbert Butterfield and the Pitfalls of Official History The Control of the Past: Herbert Butterfield and the Pitfalls of Official History
Patrick Salmon
December 6, 2021

Herbert Butterfield (1900–1979) was one of the earliest and strongest critics of what he saw as the British government’s attempts to control the past through the writing of so-called, ‘official histories’. His famous diatribe against the 'pitfalls' of government-mandated history first appeared in 1949, at a time when the British government was engaged in publishing official histories and diplomatic documents on an unprecedented scale following the Second World War. But why was Butterfield so hostile to official history, and why do his views still matter today?

Written by...

Cover for The Politics of Women's Suffrage: Local, National and International Dimensions The Politics of Women's Suffrage: Local, National and International Dimensions
Alexandra Hughes-Johnson, Lyndsey Jenkins (eds)
November 1, 2021

From 1832 to the present day, from the countryside in Wales to the Comintern in Moscow, from America to Finland and Ireland to Australia, from the girls’ school to the stage, women’s suffrage was the most significant challenge to the constitution since 1832, seeking not only to settle demands for inclusion and justice but to expand and redefine definitions of citizenship. This collection advances ongoing debates within suffrage history whilst also drawing on a range of new sources, different intellectual techniques and methodological approaches, which challenge established...

Cover for Precarious Professionals: Gender, Identities and Social Change in Modern Britain Precarious Professionals: Gender, Identities and Social Change in Modern Britain
Heidi Egginton, Zoë Thomas (eds)
October 15, 2021

Precarious Professionals uncovers the inequalities and insecurities which lay at the heart of professional life in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Britain. The book challenges conventional categories in the history of work, exploring instead the everyday labour of maintaining a professional identity on the margins of the traditional professions. Situating new historical perspectives on gender at the forefront of their research, the contributors explore how professional cultures could not only define themselves against, but often flourished outside of, the confines of...

Cover for Star Chamber Matters: An Early Modern Court and Its Records Star Chamber Matters: An Early Modern Court and Its Records
Krista Kesselring, Natalie Mears (eds)
September 30, 2021

An extraordinary court with late medieval roots in the activities of the king’s council, Star Chamber came into its own over the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, before being abolished in 1641 by members of parliament for what they deemed egregious abuses of royal power. Before its demise, the court heard a wide range of disputes in cases framed as fraud, libel, riot, and more. In so doing, it produced records of a sort that make its archive invaluable to many researchers today for insights into both the ordinary and extraordinary.

The chapters gathered here explore...

Cover for Children’s Experiences of Welfare in Modern Britain Children’s Experiences of Welfare in Modern Britain
Siân Pooley, Jonathan Taylor (eds)
September 17, 2021

The history of childhood and welfare in Britain through the eyes of children. Children’s Experiences of Welfare in Modern Britain brings together the latest research as provided by the state, charities and families from 1830 to 1980. Demonstrating how the young were integral to the making, interpretation, delivery and impact of welfare services, the chapters consider a wide range of investments in young people’s lives, including residential institutions, emigration schemes, hospitals and clinics, schools, social housing and familial care. Drawing upon thousands of personal...

Cover for Church and People in Interregnum Britain Church and People in Interregnum Britain
Fiona McCall (ed)
June 23, 2021

In 1645, as the First Civil War approached its end, a second Reformation took place which created profound dislocations in religion and in British society. The Church was disestablished, and godly puritan practices promoted in parish churches and everyday life.  Some clergy and parishioners embraced change;  others were horrified, experiencing these as times of madness and trouble. Historians continue to debate the extent of the social disruption that resulted, and the impact of godly...

Cover for Coal Country: The Meaning and Memory of Deindustrialization in Postwar Scotland Coal Country: The Meaning and Memory of Deindustrialization in Postwar Scotland
Ewan Gibbs
February 15, 2021

The flooding and subsequent closure of Scotland’s last deep coal mine in 2002 was a milestone in the nation’s deindustrialization. Villages and towns across the densely populated central belt owe their existence to coal mining’s expansion during the nineteenth century and its maturation in the twentieth. Colliery closures and job losses were not just experienced in economic terms: they had profound social, cultural and political implications. Coal Country presents the first book-length account of deindustrialization in the Scottish coalfields. It draws on archival research using...

Cover for Masculinity and Danger on the Eighteenth-Century Grand Tour Masculinity and Danger on the Eighteenth-Century Grand Tour
Sarah Goldsmith
November 30, 2020

The Grand Tour was a journey to continental Europe undertaken by British nobility and wealthy landed gentry during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. As a rite of passage, the Tour also played an important role in the formation of contemporary notions of elite masculinity.

Examining letters, diaries and other records left by Grand Tourists, tutors and their families, this book demonstrates how the Tour was used to educate elite young men in a wide variety of skills, virtues and masculine behaviours that extended well beyond polite society.

Sarah Goldsmith argues...

Cover for Unite, Proletarian Brothers! Radicalism and Revolution in the Spanish Second Republic Unite, Proletarian Brothers! Radicalism and Revolution in the Spanish Second Republic
Matthew Kerry
September 30, 2020

In October 1934 the northern Spanish region of Asturias was the scene of the most important outburst of revolution in Europe between the early 1920s and the Spanish Civil War. Thousands of left-wing militants took up arms and fought the Spanish army in the streets of Oviedo while in the rear-guard committees proclaimed a revolutionary dawn. After two weeks, however, the insurrection was crushed. The widespread repression that followed was central to the polarization and fragmentation of Spanish politics prior to the Civil War (1936–9).

Unite, Proletarian Brothers!...

Cover for Administering the Empire, 1801-1968: A Guide to the Records of the Colonial Office in the National Archives of the UK Administering the Empire, 1801-1968: A Guide to the Records of the Colonial Office in the National Archives of the UK
Mandy Banton
September 11, 2020

Administering the Empire, 1801-1968 is an indispensable introduction to British colonial rule during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It provides an essential guide to the records of the British Colonial Office, and those of other departments responsible for colonial administration, which are now held in The National Archives of the United Kingdom.

As a user-friendly archival guide, Administering the Empire explains the organisation of these records, the information they provide, and how best to explore them using contemporary finding...

Cover for Individuals and Institutions in Medieval Scholasticism Individuals and Institutions in Medieval Scholasticism
Antonia Fitzpatrick, John Sabapathy (eds)
July 30, 2020

This volume explores the relationship between individuals and institutions in scholastic thought and practice across the twelfth and fifteenth centuries, setting an agenda for future debates. Written by leading European experts from numerous fields, this theoretically sophisticated collection analyses a wide range of intellectual practices and disciplines. Avoiding narrow approaches to scholasticism, the book addresses ethics, history, heresy, law, inquisition, metaphysics, pastoral care, poetry, religious orders, saints’ cults and theology. A substantial introduction establishes an...

Cover for The Creighton Century, 1907-2007 The Creighton Century, 1907-2007
David Bates, Jennifer Wallis, Jane Winters (eds)
July 17, 2020

The Creighton Century, 1907–2007 offers a selection of ten lectures from the first 100 years of the University of London’s prestigious Creighton Lecture series. Each of the chosen lectures, delivered between 1913 and 2004, is introduced and set in context by a historian of the modern-day University. The collection also includes, and is introduced by, Robert Evans’s 2007 centenary lecture, ‘The Creighton century: British historians and Europe, 1907–2007’.

This volume provides a fascinating insight into the development of the discipline of history over the...

Cover for European Religious Cultures: Essays offered to Christopher Brooke on the occasion of his eightieth birthday European Religious Cultures: Essays offered to Christopher Brooke on the occasion of his eightieth birthday
Miri Rubin (ed)
July 3, 2020

European Religious Cultures is a set of stimulating essays first written as offerings for Christopher Brooke on his eightieth birthday. They are now gathered for the enjoyment of all those interested in the history of religious cultures. They address a variety of practices in religious life - among them pilgrimage and the urban cult of saints, the monastic performance of liturgy, the choice to enter the priesthood - and situate them within the life-cycles and social relations of medieval Europeans. The authors have been inspired by Christopher Brooke's own interests over a...

Cover for Civilian Specialists at War: Britain's Transport Experts and the First World War Civilian Specialists at War: Britain's Transport Experts and the First World War
Christopher Phillips
April 30, 2020

The war of 1914–18 was the first great conflict to be fought between highly industrial societies able to manufacture and transport immense quantities of goods to the field of battle. In Civilian Specialists at War, Christopher Phillips examines the manner in which Britain’s industrial society influenced the character and conduct of industrial warfare. This book analyses the multiple connections between the military, the government and the senior executives of some of pre-war Britain’s largest companies. It illustrates the British army’s evolving response to the First...

Cover for Cinemas and Cinema-Going in the United Kingdom: Decades of Decline, 1945–65 Cinemas and Cinema-Going in the United Kingdom: Decades of Decline, 1945–65
Sam Manning
March 31, 2020

Cinema-going was the most popular commercial leisure activity in the first half of the twentieth century, peaking in 1946 with 1.6 billion recorded admissions. Though ‘going to the pictures’ remained a popular pastime, the transition to peacetime altered citizens’ leisure habits. During the 1950s increased affluence, the growth of television ownership and the diversification of leisure led to rapid declines in attendance. Cinema attendances fell in all regions, but the speed, nature and extent of decline varied widely across the United Kingdom.

By linking national...

Cover for Medieval Londoners: Essays to mark the eightieth birthday of Caroline M. Barron Medieval Londoners: Essays to mark the eightieth birthday of Caroline M. Barron
Christian Steer, Elizabeth New (eds)
October 31, 2019

Medieval Londoners were a diverse group, some born in the city, and others drawn to the capital from across the realm and from overseas. For some, London became the sole focus of their lives, while others retained or developed networks and loyalties that spread far and wide. The rich evidence for the medieval city, including archaeological and documentary evidence, means that the study of London and its inhabitants remains an active field. Medieval Londoners brings together archaeologists, historians, art historians and literary scholars whose essays provide glimpses of medieval...

Cover for The Family Firm: Monarchy, Mass Media and the British Public, 1932-53 The Family Firm: Monarchy, Mass Media and the British Public, 1932-53
Edward Owens
October 15, 2019

The Family Firm presents the first major historical analysis of the transformation of the royal household’s public relations strategy in the period 1932-1953. Beginning with King George V’s first Christmas broadcast, Buckingham Palace worked with the Church of England and the media to initiate a new phase in the House of Windsor’s approach to publicity.

This book also focuses on audience reception by exploring how British readers, listeners, and viewers made sense of royalty’s new...

Cover for Empty Spaces: perspectives on emptiness in modern history Empty Spaces: perspectives on emptiness in modern history
Courtney J. Campbell, Allegra Giovine, Jennifer Keating (eds)
August 21, 2019

How is emptiness made and what historical purpose does it serve? What cultural, material and natural work goes into maintaining ‘nothingness’? Why have a variety of historical actors, from colonial powers to artists and urban dwellers, sought to construct, control and maintain (physically and discursively) empty space, and by which processes is emptiness discovered, visualised and reimagined?

This volume draws together contributions from authors working on landscapes and rurality, along with national and imperial narratives, from Brazil to Russia and Ireland. It considers the...

Cover for Thomas Frederick Tout (1855–1929): refashioning history for the twentieth century Thomas Frederick Tout (1855–1929): refashioning history for the twentieth century
Joel T. Rosenthal, Caroline M. Barron (eds)
August 21, 2019

Thomas Frederick Tout (1855–1929) was arguably the most prolific English medieval historian of the early twentieth century. The son of an unsuccessful publican, he was described at his Oxford scholarship exam as ‘uncouth and untidy’; however he went on to publish hundreds of books throughout his distinguished career with a legacy that extended well beyond the academy. Tout pioneered the use of archival research, welcomed women into academia and augmented the University of Manchester’s growing reputation for pioneering research.

This book presents the first full assessment...

Cover for Suffrage and citizenship in Ireland, 1912-18 Suffrage and citizenship in Ireland, 1912-18
Senia Pašeta
January 24, 2019

The 2018 Kehoe Lecture in Irish History: presented on 15 November 2018 at the Institute of Historical Research, University of London

Professor Senia Pašeta argues that our understanding of modern Irish and British politics would be enormously enriched if we recognized two things: that the Irish and British suffrage movements were deeply connected; and that the women’s suffrage movement across the United Kingdom was shaped in fundamental ways by the Irish Question from the late nineteenth century and into the twentieth.

As Professor Pašeta demonstrates, the...

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