38 Titles

History

Cover for Masculinity and Danger on the Eighteenth-Century Grand Tour Masculinity and Danger on the Eighteenth-Century Grand Tour
Sarah Goldsmith
November 30, 2020

The Grand Tour was a journey to continental Europe undertaken by British nobility and wealthy landed gentry during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. As a rite of passage, the Tour also played an important role in the formation of contemporary notions of elite masculinity.

Examining letters, diaries and other records left by Grand Tourists, tutors and their families, this book demonstrates how the Tour was used to educate elite young men in a wide variety of skills, virtues and masculine behaviours that extended well beyond polite society.

Sarah Goldsmith argues...

Cover for Medieval merchants and money: Essays in honour of James L. Bolton Medieval merchants and money: Essays in honour of James L. Bolton
Martin Allen, Matthew Davies (eds)
October 27, 2016

This volume contains selected essays in celebration of the scholarship of the medieval historian Professor James L. Bolton. The essays address a number of different questions in medieval economic and social history, as the volume looks at the activities of merchants, their trade, legal interactions and identities, and on the importance of money and credit in the rural and urban economies. Other essays look more widely at patterns of immigration  to London, trade and royal policy, and the role that merchants played in the Hundred Years War.

Published as part of the 

Cover for Octavia Hill, social activism and the remaking of British society Octavia Hill, social activism and the remaking of British society
Elizabeth Baigent, Ben Cowell (eds)
March 17, 2016

This volume reassesses the life and work of Octavia Hill, housing reformer, open space campaigner, co-founder of the National Trust, founder of the Army Cadet Force, and the first woman to be invited to sit on a royal commission. In her lifetime, if not a household name, Octavia Hill was widely regarded as an authority on a broad range of acknowledged social problems, particularly housing and poverty. Yet despite her early pre-eminence, subsequent attempts by family members to keep her memory alive, and the remarkable success of the institutions which she helped to found, Hill fell from...

Cover for People, Texts and Artefacts: Cultural Transmission in the Norman Worlds of the Eleventh and Twelfth Centuries People, Texts and Artefacts: Cultural Transmission in the Norman Worlds of the Eleventh and Twelfth Centuries
David Bates, Edoardo D'Angelo, Elisabeth van Houts (eds)
January 31, 2018

This volume is based on two international conferences held in 2013 and 2014 at Ariano Irpino, and at Emmanuel College, Cambridge. It contains essays by leading scholars in the field. Like the conferences, the volume seeks to enhance interdisciplinary and international dialogue between those who work on the Normans and their conquests in northern and southern Europe in an original way.

This collection has as its central theme issues related to cultural transfer, treated as being of a pan-European kind across the societies that the Normans conquered and as occurring within the...

Cover for Pieter Geyl and Britain: Encounters, Controversies, Impact Pieter Geyl and Britain: Encounters, Controversies, Impact
Stijn van Rossem, Ulrich Tiedau (eds)
September 29, 2022

Pieter Geyl (1887—1966) was undoubtedly one of the most internationally renowned Dutch historians of the twentieth century, but also one of the most controversial. Having come to the UK as a journalist, he started his academic career at the University of London in the aftermath of World War I (1919) and played an important role in the early days of the Institute of Historical Research. Known in this time for his re-interpretation of the sixteenth-century Dutch Revolt against the Habsburgs, that challenged existing historiographies of both Belgium and the Netherlands but was also linked...

Cover for Precarious Professionals: Gender, Identities and Social Change in Modern Britain Precarious Professionals: Gender, Identities and Social Change in Modern Britain
Heidi Egginton, Zoë Thomas (eds)
October 15, 2021

Precarious Professionals uncovers the inequalities and insecurities which lay at the heart of professional life in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Britain. The book challenges conventional categories in the history of work, exploring instead the everyday labour of maintaining a professional identity on the margins of the traditional professions. Situating new historical perspectives on gender at the forefront of their research, the contributors explore how professional cultures could not only define themselves against, but often flourished outside of, the confines of...

Cover for Providing for the Poor: The Old Poor Law, 1750–1834 Providing for the Poor: The Old Poor Law, 1750–1834
Peter Collinge, Louise Falcini (eds)
August 30, 2022

The Old Poor Law in England and Wales, administered by the local parish, dispensed benefits to paupers providing a uniquely comprehensive, pre-modern system of relief. Remaining in force until 1834, the law provided goods and services to keep the poor alive.

Combining short- and long-form articles and essays, Providing for the Poor brings together academics and practitioners from across disciplines to re-examine the micro-politics of poverty in the long eighteenth century through the eyes of the poor, their providers and enablers. From the providence of the parochial...

Cover for Ravenna: its role in earlier medieval change and exchange Ravenna: its role in earlier medieval change and exchange
Judith Herrin, Jinty Nelson (eds)
July 14, 2016

In the long-debated transition from late antiquity to the early middle ages, the city of Ravenna presents a story rich and strange. From the fourth century onwards it suffered decline in economic terms. Yet its geographical position, its status as an imperial capital, and above all its role as a connecting-point between East and West, ensured that it remained an intermittent attraction for early medieval kings and emperors throughout the period from the late fifth to the eleventh century.

Ravenna’s story is all the more interesting because it was complicated and unpredictable:...

Cover for Revisiting the Falklands-Malvinas Question: Transnational and Interdisciplinary Perspectives Revisiting the Falklands-Malvinas Question: Transnational and Interdisciplinary Perspectives
Guillermo Mira Delli-Zotti, Fernando Pedrosa (eds)
February 22, 2021

The conflict over possession of the Falklands-Malvinas Islands was waged in an area remote both geographically and geo-politically in an era of cold war and also of tensions within and between sovereign states of the supposed western bloc. It has been broadly perceived as an absurd confrontation, the echoes of which, despite the brevity of its duration, and some four decades on, resonate still not least in the lasting wounds that bear testimony yet to its underlying causes. 

This book probes the reasons behind the conflict’s tragic occurrence and the processing of its...

Cover for She said she was in the family way: Pregnancy and infancy in modern Ireland She said she was in the family way: Pregnancy and infancy in modern Ireland
Elaine Farrell (ed)
March 15, 2012

'She said she was in the family way' examines the subject of pregnancy and infancy in Ireland from the seventeenth to the twentieth century. It draws on exciting and innovative research by early-career and established academics, and consider topics that have been largely ignored by historians in Ireland. The book makes an important contribution to Irish women’s history, family history, childhood history, social history, crime history and medical history, and will provide a reference point for academics interested in themes of sexuality, childbirth, infanthood and...

Cover for Star Chamber Matters: An Early Modern Court and Its Records Star Chamber Matters: An Early Modern Court and Its Records
Krista Kesselring, Natalie Mears (eds)
September 30, 2021

An extraordinary court with late medieval roots in the activities of the king’s council, Star Chamber came into its own over the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, before being abolished in 1641 by members of parliament for what they deemed egregious abuses of royal power. Before its demise, the court heard a wide range of disputes in cases framed as fraud, libel, riot, and more. In so doing, it produced records of a sort that make its archive invaluable to many researchers today for insights into both the ordinary and extraordinary.

The chapters gathered here explore...

Cover for The Control of the Past: Herbert Butterfield and the Pitfalls of Official History The Control of the Past: Herbert Butterfield and the Pitfalls of Official History
Patrick Salmon
December 6, 2021

Herbert Butterfield (1900–1979) was one of the earliest and strongest critics of what he saw as the British government’s attempts to control the past through the writing of so-called, ‘official histories’. His famous diatribe against the 'pitfalls' of government-mandated history first appeared in 1949, at a time when the British government was engaged in publishing official histories and diplomatic documents on an unprecedented scale following the Second World War. But why was Butterfield so hostile to official history, and why do his views still matter today?

Written by...

Cover for The Glasgow Sugar Aristocracy: Scotland and Caribbean Slavery, 1775–1838 The Glasgow Sugar Aristocracy: Scotland and Caribbean Slavery, 1775–1838
Stephen Mullen
November 10, 2022

This important book assesses the size and nature of Caribbean slavery’s economic impact in British society. The Glasgow Sugar Aristocracy, a grouping of West India merchants and planters, became active before the emancipation of chattel slavery in the British West Indies in 1834. Many acquired nationally significant fortunes, and their investments percolated into the Scottish economy and wider society. At its core, the book traces the development of merchant capital and poses several interrelated questions during an era of rapid transformation, namely, what impact the private...

Cover for The Margins of Late Medieval London, 1430-1540 The Margins of Late Medieval London, 1430-1540
Charlotte Berry
February 15, 2022

The Margins of Late Medieval London is a powerful study of medieval London’s urban fringe. Seeking to unpack the complexity of urban life in the medieval age, this volume offers a detailed and novel approach to understanding London beyond its institutional structures.

Using a combination of experimental digital, quantitative and qualitative methodologies, the volume casts new light on urban life at the level of the neighbourhood and considers the differences in economy, society and sociability which existed in different areas of a vibrant premodern city. It...

Cover for The Poets Laureate of the Long Eighteenth Century, 1668–1813: Courting the Public The Poets Laureate of the Long Eighteenth Century, 1668–1813: Courting the Public
Leo Shipp
August 31, 2022

The office of the poet laureate of Britain was a highly prominent, relevant and respectable institution throughout the long eighteenth century. First instituted for John Dryden in 1668, the laureateship developed from an honorific into a functionary office with a settled position in court (c.1689–1715), and was bestowed upon Robert Southey in 1813, whose tenure eventually transformed the office.

Taking an interdisciplinary approach, this book examines the office’s institutional changes and public reception, the mechanics of each laureate’s appointment, and the works...

Cover for The Politics of Women's Suffrage: Local, National and International Dimensions The Politics of Women's Suffrage: Local, National and International Dimensions
Alexandra Hughes-Johnson, Lyndsey Jenkins (eds)
November 1, 2021

From 1832 to the present day, from the countryside in Wales to the Comintern in Moscow, from America to Finland and Ireland to Australia, from the girls’ school to the stage, women’s suffrage was the most significant challenge to the constitution since 1832, seeking not only to settle demands for inclusion and justice but to expand and redefine definitions of citizenship. This collection advances ongoing debates within suffrage history whilst also drawing on a range of new sources, different intellectual techniques and methodological approaches, which challenge established...

Cover for Thomas Frederick Tout (1855–1929): refashioning history for the twentieth century Thomas Frederick Tout (1855–1929): refashioning history for the twentieth century
Joel T. Rosenthal, Caroline M. Barron (eds)
August 21, 2019

Thomas Frederick Tout (1855–1929) was arguably the most prolific English medieval historian of the early twentieth century. The son of an unsuccessful publican, he was described at his Oxford scholarship exam as ‘uncouth and untidy’; however he went on to publish hundreds of books throughout his distinguished career with a legacy that extended well beyond the academy. Tout pioneered the use of archival research, welcomed women into academia and augmented the University of Manchester’s growing reputation for pioneering research.

This book presents the first full assessment...

Cover for Unite, Proletarian Brothers! Radicalism and Revolution in the Spanish Second Republic Unite, Proletarian Brothers! Radicalism and Revolution in the Spanish Second Republic
Matthew Kerry
September 30, 2020

In October 1934 the northern Spanish region of Asturias was the scene of the most important outburst of revolution in Europe between the early 1920s and the Spanish Civil War. Thousands of left-wing militants took up arms and fought the Spanish army in the streets of Oviedo while in the rear-guard committees proclaimed a revolutionary dawn. After two weeks, however, the insurrection was crushed. The widespread repression that followed was central to the polarization and fragmentation of Spanish politics prior to the Civil War (1936–9).

Unite, Proletarian Brothers!...

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